The Wall Street Journal reported earlier this week that

 after the pilots turned off the MCAS, they were unable to regain control of the plane. They then re-engaged the anti-stall syste

m, the Journal said. It was not clear why the pilots did not continue following Boeing’s emergency checklist. Aviation exper

ts who asked not to be named told China Daily that using nonstandard procedures may have made things worse.

The preliminary finding by Ethiopian authorities likely will increase pressure on Boeing to deve

lop and install new software for the MCAS. It also is expected to result in a rigorous review of the softw

are fix by the US Federal Aviation Administration, which has been criticized by aviation analysts and mem

ers of Congress for depending too heavily on aircraft industry officials to certify their new planes as safe.

The FAA said late on Wednesday that it will launch a joint task force with NASA and internati

onal aviation regulators to review Boeing’s new software for the anti-stall system. The task force will be headed

by Chris Hart, former chairman of the US National Transportation Safety Board. The FAA has not released the nam

es of those to serve on the Joint Authorities Technical Review team, their affiliations or nationalities.

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